The Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Park

What happens when historians consider not only the activism but the faith of activists? That is the question I explored at the 2018 Conference on Faith and History. I presented a paper as apart of a panel on the Long Civil Rights Movement. To prepare for the talk I visited the Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Park in her hometown of Ruleville, Mississippi. Below is a photo journey of my visit.

 

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Located in Ruleville, MS the park is tucked away on small street in the middle of town.
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The statue of Hamer depicts in the act of speaking or singing–a testament to the physical and symbolic power of her voice.
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Inscription on the Fannie Lou Hamer statue.
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A closer image of the woman with “a voice that could stir an army.”
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William Chapel Missionary Baptist is the church where Hamer first heard about voting rights and volunteered to register.
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The historical marker at William Chapel
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Fannie Lou Hamer had the full support of her husband Perry “Pap” Hamer. They are buried side-by-side at the memorial park.

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