James Cone, the cross, and the lynching memorial

- This post by Jemar originally appeared here at Religion News Service -     (RNS) - On April 26 America received its first-ever memorial dedicated to the more than 4,000 victims of lynching in this country. Two days later, James Cone, the acclaimed author of “The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” died. The opening of … Continue reading James Cone, the cross, and the lynching memorial

The Most Uncomfortable Part about Writing a Book

I decided to write my forthcoming book, The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism, because I could not conscience going to another church or Christian organization to speak about racial justice only to see nothing change afterwards. A Historical Approach My work involves preaching and teaching about the how racism … Continue reading The Most Uncomfortable Part about Writing a Book

The Museum of the New South Helps Us Understand Racism in the South after the Civil War

During a visit to Charlotte, North Carolina I visited the Levine Museum of the New South and I couldn’t wait to share some of the information I gained there. The term “New South” refers to the post-Civil War and post-slavery South that was trying to move beyond its white supremacist roots toward a future with economic … Continue reading The Museum of the New South Helps Us Understand Racism in the South after the Civil War

A Few Thoughts on Standardized Testing During Testing Season

From February through May you'll find a common emphasis across the nation's public schools. For weeks or months at a time schools prepare their students in what has become a hallmark of modern education--the standardized test. I have the privilege of serving some of our country's finest burgeoning minds as the interim principal of Midtown … Continue reading A Few Thoughts on Standardized Testing During Testing Season